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Putting captured "wild gups" with my fancy? [Archive] - Guppies.com

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Elise
March 25th-2005, 04:18 PM
I went to my lake and caught 7 mud guppies...also called misquito guppies, anyway, should I put them in with my fancy guppies? I don't mind if they interbreed, but I wonder if they might have some kind of diseases or something that my fancy-storebought fish have no immunity to. My tank is just recovering from a disease and I don't want to start the process over again. Anyone out there who has done this before? Comments would be appreciated!

WordOfAdvice
March 25th-2005, 04:21 PM
Its hard to introduce the lake minnows to tap water. I wouldn't recommend it. I wouldn't mix the minnows with your gups. Minnows aren't worth a person's care (no offense), their better off living on their own in the wild.

Elise
March 25th-2005, 05:28 PM
I've already introduced them to the tap water. I know they aren't pretty or anything but my friend caught me one as a joke as a kid and now I just like them. :p So you think I just shouldn't put them in with my fancies because they're worthless...not because they'll have diseases?

CdnGup
March 25th-2005, 07:51 PM
Are they true "misquito guppies" ??? There is a guppy family member called exactly that, and also refered to as the " Millions Fish ".. You can adapt the wild fish to an aquarium, but sometimes the losses can be high.. From time to time I have had the chance to buy F0 Cichlids ( the F0 term refers to them being Wild caught ), I will often settle on F1's as they have been breed in the aquarium environment..

If you are intrested in Wild caught fish, perhaps check out aquabid.com . A seller named Woodle, will sometimes catch "wild" live bearers from the tributaries leading to the Salton Sea in Southern California.. The fish she catchs were introduced species ( accidental ) by former breeders from the area.. Hope this has helped you ..

Regards..

WordOfAdvice
March 25th-2005, 09:09 PM
I've already introduced them to the tap water. I know they aren't pretty or anything but my friend caught me one as a joke as a kid and now I just like them. :p So you think I just shouldn't put them in with my fancies because they're worthless...not because they'll have diseases?

It's not that their worthless, I'm trying to say that they will have a better chance to survive in the wild. Many will died when a person introduces it to tap water. Well, I feel guilty killing things...you can if you what.

Guppyman®
March 25th-2005, 09:37 PM
Are they true "misquito guppies" ??? There is a guppy family member called exactly that, and also refered to as the " Millions FishActually, guppies for many years were referred to as the "Millions Fish." Mosquito fish are an entirely different species, Gambusia affinis. - Frank/Guppyman®

MADMIKE
March 25th-2005, 09:49 PM
It would be better to introduce them to there own tank to see if they make it and don`t have any diseases.Later you could add them to your tank

CdnGup
March 27th-2005, 06:41 PM
I hear conflicting names Frank... I said that about guppies a few years ago to some one some where.. They said no no, not guppies but misquito fish are called that.. I always wondered about that, but didn't really worry about the slang name, simply decided to refer to Gups as Gups and Sketer fish as Sketer Fish... *lol*

Regrads...

Guppyman®
March 27th-2005, 06:52 PM
I hear conflicting names Frank... I said that about guppies a few years ago to some one some where.. They said no no, not guppies but misquito fish are called that.. I always wondered about that, but didn't really worry about the slang name, simply decided to refer to Gups as Gups and Sketer fish as Sketer Fish... *lol* Regrads...Hi. You were right, they were wrong. - Frank/Guppyman®

kimo
March 28th-2005, 03:33 AM
Its hard to introduce the lake minnows to tap water. I wouldn't recommend it. I wouldn't mix the minnows with your gups. Minnows aren't worth a person's care (no offense), their better off living on their own in the wild.

Been there - done that. Just find out beforehand which types of fish you can keep. The local govt does not look to kindly on someone who has just collected some fish that is on the endangered list.

I currently have lake minnows in one tank and have had them breed. In the 70's I founf a cullhead catfish (0.25") in some plants I had collected. When he died at age 9 he was over 18" long, in a tank (150g) full of guppies and never ate 1. I've had wild brook trout, sunfish, yellow perch and just about every type of wild water plant that grows in the northeast.

Do you really want to learn about water quality, plankton, algae, fresh water diatoms, fish and all the curious microscopic water animals that go along with it...? Try raising a few wild caught minnows... see if you can get them to live long enough to breed (most are egg scatterers). I'd say it was more of a challenge than raising something bought in a LFS. LOTs of fun :) :) :)
BTW: you will learn many different ways of treating diseases in the meantime. Some are not even seen in the pet trade. Purchase a good microscope!

Rey
June 5th-2005, 03:58 AM
There are two types of guppies other than Fancies:

Feeder Guppies: Are the diseased, undernurished, poorly cared for, cheap Guppies that they sell to feed bigger fish. They look like Wild Guppy WWII concentration camp survivors. Their coloration and general shape is the same as the Wild Guppies but their genome has changed over the years and they are not as disease resistant as the wild variety. These fish are not Wild Guppies. They are likely to introduce disease into your tank.
!

Wild: They grow in the tropics, males are not as colorful or big as Fancies. Females are generally larger than Fancy Females but do not have any coloration other than dull gray and silver. Because the Wild Fish are more resistant to disease than the Fancy Fish, they may be carrying disease that does not affect them (particularly parasites) but can wipe out your Fancies.

Most vendors selling wild guppies simply mix various Fancy Breeds with some Wild Guppies and then try to pass them as wild. If your guppy has a long tail or dorsal fin it is probably one of these fakes.

If you want to know if you have a wild fish, first find out where in the wild it was collected. Second, compare it to feeder guppies. The shape and coloration should be the same. The Wild Guppy will be slightly bigger and much more vigorous and healthy. Are you sure that you don't have Mosquito-Rainbow/Fish/Minnows? :confused:

Guppies have been released into all continents with tropical and close to tropical climates either to control mosquitoes or by careless owners. Many people confuse the more aggressive, egg laying, cold hardy, less colorful Mosquito Fish/Minnow with Wild Guppies. Both have been called Mosquito Fish and been introduced to many areas to control the pests.Though Wild Guppies and Mosquito Fish coexist in many waters, the population of Wild Guppies in those waters are very small as the aggressive Minnnow eats most guppy babies.

The key coloration giveaway for both wild and feeder is the presence of "eye" spots. These genetically pervasive spots are incredibly hard to eliminate from the genome and would turn an otherwise perfect "Show Fish" into a Pretty Feeder Fish. Not all Wild and Feeder Guppies have "Eye" Spots but most do. If not visible it is very likely to be in the fish' genome. Fear of the reapperance of the eye delayed attempts to create black guppies for 1/2 of a century. To this point the closest that anyone has got to a pure black guppy is a 3/4 black guppy. Do you want to add undesirable traits to your Fancy Guppies? :eek:

Remember every Fancy Guppy Line comes from the humble Wild Guppy. The further removed that the fancies become from their wild forefathers, the weaker and more prone to disease that they become. The gene mutation that created that dazzling tail or color may have also affected immunity to some diseases (Like Royal Families :D .)

I still reintroduce wild genes into my lines every few years to strenghten my fish line resistance to disease and genetic inbreading. I normally introduce a single relatively special wild male that I have fished myself. Right now I have a large bottom swordtail (natural mutation) with pastel colors and only one "black eye spot" that I caught in a stream in Puerto Rico under observation. He will undergo a couple of months of disease pretreatment before I let him be with only one female. I don't even breed anymore and I am still this careful with the fish I love.



BTW: Two females to a male is the natural ratio for guppies. 1:1 is more stressful for the females. In the wild the females do not select the most colorful male to mate. They just give up to the most insistent, persistent and annoying ( ever date someone like that? :eek: ) male. The male's colors are not for courtship but for species preservation. When a school is attacked the males colors attract predators giving the uncolored pregnant females time to flee and hide.